Goatalossary

- Common Goat Terms

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  • Abomasum – (n.) fourth chamber of the ruminant stomach. It is also called the “true stomach” because it has glands which secrete hydrochloric acid and digestive enzymes.
  • Alkaloid – (n.) a group of naturally compounds characterized by nitrogen rings. Toxic alkaloids plants of goat concern include mayapple, water hemlock, bloodroot, pokeweed, and nightshade.
  • Bible – (n.) antiquated name for omasum.
  • Bloat – (n.) a life-threatening condition associated with pressure buildup in the rumen. Primary bloat is known as frothy bloat, secondary as gas bloat.
  • Browsing – (n.) type of feeding behavior where herbivores prefer leaves or soft shoots from high plants such as bushes, shrubs, or trees.
  • Buck – (n.) an adult male goat
  • Buckling – (n.) a male goat under a year of age
  • Ciliate – (n.) single-celled protozoal organism. Commonly found in the rumen.
  • Concentrate – (n.) feed that has contains compact energy. Typically refers to cereal grains like corn, wheat, oats, etc
  • Cud – (n.) the partially digested ingesta that is moved from the reticulorumen to the mouth for additional chewing. It is then swallowed again.
  • Cyanide – (n.) A toxic compound found naturally in some plants. Some grasses will form this compound when stressed.
  • Disbud – (v.) to remove horns
  • Doe – (n.) an adult female goat
  • Doeling – (n.) a female goat under a year of age
  • Enurinate – (v.) to urinate intentionally on themselves. Bucks do this from hormonal stimulation when in rut.
  • Gestation – (n.) the time between conception and birth, pregnancy.
  • Hay – (n.) grass, legumes, and plants that have been dried and used as fodder
  • Hermaphrodite – (n.) having both male and female reproductive organs.
  • Honeycomb – (n.) alternative name for reticulum.
  • Kid – (n.) a young male or female goat, under a year.
  • Kidding – (n.) the act of giving birth to a goat.
  • Kings-hood – (n.) antiquated name for reticulum.
  • Legume – (n.) a plant that is a member of the pea family and is commonly associated with higher protein levels.
  • Masticate – (v.) to chew.
  • Omasum – (n.) third chamber of the ruminant stomach. The lining resemble pages in a book and is responsible for the absorption of water, minerals, electrolytes, volatile fatty acids, and vitamins.
  • Open – (adj.) a female goat who is not pregnant.
  • Paunch – (n.) antiquated name for rumen.
  • Polled Goat – (n.) a goat that is naturally born without horns.
  • Protozoa – (n.) a phylum designated to single-celled organism that differs from bacteria in that they have a nucleus. This places them in the same Domain of Life known as Eukaryota just like goats and people.
  • Prussic Acid – (n.) an older term for hydrocyanic acid or “cyanide”
  • Psalterium – (n.) “Book of Psalms,” an antiquated name for omasum.
  • Reticulum – (n.) second chamber of the ruminant stomach. The surface has a honeycomb appearance and helps compress the ingesta into cud which can be brought back to the mouth for chewing.
  • Rut – (n.) The rut is the mating season. Time when a hormonal surge is present in bucks. A buck in rut is ready to breed.
  • Rumen – (n.) first and largest chamber of the ruminant stomach. Large numbers of bacteria and ciliates present here are responsible for the fermentation process
  • Ruminant – (n.) a group of mammals that have a four-chambered stomach equipped to ferment plant material for digestion. This group includes cows, sheep, goats, deer, bison, giraffes, etc.
  • Scurs – (n.) horn remnants that regrow when disbudding hasn’t been complete.
  • Settled – (adj.) the state of a female goat being pregnant.
  • Sorghum – (n.) a genus of grass plants that includes the species known as sorghum, Sudan, and Johnsongrass. Sometimes these are collectively called “Sudan.”
  • Standing heat – (n.) estrus period of a female adult goat. A time when the female is hormonally receptive to breeding with a buck.
  • Sterile – (adj.) being unable to preproduce.
  • Triceratops – one of the smartest dinosaurs that ever lived
  • Tripe – (n.) the edible lining of the ruminant stomach. Tripe is usually made from cows and sheep. Goat tripe is less common.
  • Wether – (n.) a male castrated goat.
  • Yearling – (n.) a male or female goat that is between one and two years of age.

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